Destructive Puppies

Discussion in 'Public General Discussion' started by Morrow.J, Nov 19, 2019.

  1. Morrow.J

    Morrow.J C/1-7 Trooper Corporal Active Member

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    So my puppies have been now and then totally destroying books and magazines in our library at night while we are asleep. They know they are bad dogs and doing wrong because I can tell the way they react and hide when we catch them. I don't know what to do to stop them from doing it. I tell them bad dog and get very serious voice and pop them but I honestly don't know how to train them to NOT do that. Any ideas? They are about 8 months
     
  2. Thumper.N

    Thumper.N Corporal Retired Member

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    Petco has a "bitter spray" that you can use on your hands or what not to discourage biting. Maybe try that? It doesn't harm anything so spraying it lightly on books, etc. shouldn't matter.
     
  3. Blake.H

    Blake.H B/1-7 Section Leader Corporal Active Member

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    My Staffie was a pain when she was a pup but found giving her a cheap toy or especially rope to demolish when she’s bored helped immensely. Thankfully they grow out of it, if they're chewing because their new teeth are hurting/old teeth being pushed out by adult teeth (generally why puppies chew,) rubber toys/rope to chew is great for this and i personally avoid anything made of plastic, nylon, metal or has lots of stiching.
     
    Last edited: Nov 19, 2019
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  4. Caulfield.H

    Caulfield.H Reservist Active Member

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    Maybe try one of those KONG brand chew toy things?

    The smaller ones are softer for little dogs, and the larger ones are more firm for big doggos
     
  5. Vermeulen.A

    Vermeulen.A S1 Officer in Charge Major Active Member

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    make it taste or smell funny. commonly that helps. also its ok to be firm to a dog, touching them as if you are another dog biting them in the neck helps alarmingly well. im not saying hit them, more like a touch/pinch. im sure ceasar milan has an example of what i mean.
     
  6. Morrow.J

    Morrow.J C/1-7 Trooper Corporal Active Member

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    I mean I didn’t like hurt them, but popped em on the butt and talked deep and stern and sharply like BAD DOG! You know? I keep saying that we should just spread toys around the house for them to play with when they are bored but my mom keeps letting them take them out into the yard.
     
  7. Rosefield.M

    Rosefield.M 1-7 Executive Officer Lieutenant Colonel Active Member

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    If its just at night or when you are out I would crate train them and if they are not sleeping through out the night they need more walks or play to burn that energy out
     
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  8. Walsh.D

    Walsh.D C/1-7 Trooper Corporal Active Member

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    90% of dog issues are handled with copious amounts of exercise. 2-3 mile jog/roller blade after dinner And before bed should do it. Dog park/back yard do not count, has to be purposeful, directed exercise.

    Has worked for me with multiple Husky fosters (a particularly destructive breed sometimes)
     
  9. Morrow.J

    Morrow.J C/1-7 Trooper Corporal Active Member

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    Yes I think this is one of the issues. I am working so much. I play with them and walk them when I can outside but I can only do it so often. My mother lets them out and they just run around freely (they jump the fence with ease now that they’re bigger) she can’t play with them really since she has arthritis and whatnot
     
  10. Bango.C

    Bango.C CSM Retired Member

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    Admonishing them after they do something is unlikely to work. Dogs sense you are upset with them and act appropriately, but they do not use deductive reasoning to figure out that them chewing on books made you upset. All it does is confuse the dogs. There are many opinions about negative reinforcement, and it does depend a bit on the dog's disposition. For most dogs, the best thing you can do is catch them in the act, then give them something they are allowed to chew on and praise them greatly when they chew on their toys. Dogs want to please you, especially if you train them regularly. A great example of this is seeing-eye dogs. They are among the best trained and most reliable of all working dogs, and they are not trained with negative reinforcement.

    8 months might be a little challenging to start, but having crates for them to sleep in is the best way to keep them from misbehaving at night or when you are out of the house. Rule of thumb for daytime crating is an hour per month of age till about 4 months. Leaving a dog in a crate more than 4 hours in the day is pushing it no matter the age. Dogs are den animals and feel secure and happy in crates when they are sleeping. My dog still goes in his crate at 3 years old. It is his safe space and it also got him through the puppy chewing days without too many missteps.

    Also, as mentioned above, if you don't actively exercise them daily, their misbehavior is pretty much unavoidable. Honestly if you don't have the time for roughly an hour a day of engaging play, consider rehoming them with someone who has the time or paying someone to give them what they need.

    Check your local humane society for classes, they do wonders. But what I learned the most from classes is that the classes aren't to train the dog to be better, but to train the handler to help the dog be better.
     
    Last edited: Nov 19, 2019
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  11. Black.A

    Black.A C/1-7 Trooper Specialist Active Member

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    Everything @Bango.C said is correct and highly advised by Black, your milsim dog expert.
     
  12. Morrow.J

    Morrow.J C/1-7 Trooper Corporal Active Member

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    Well I caught them in the act it was not after the fact really.
     
  13. Morrow.J

    Morrow.J C/1-7 Trooper Corporal Active Member

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    Thank you to all who replied this is greatly helpful
     
  14. Green.R

    Green.R C/1-7 First Sergeant First Sergeant Active Member

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    Even if you caught them in the act, positive reinforcement is known to work a lot better than negative reinforcement
     
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  15. Morrow.J

    Morrow.J C/1-7 Trooper Corporal Active Member

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    how do you reward them for playing with the toys instead. Say I catch them in the act again and I want to redirect them to the toys how would I reward them for playing with the toy? Like a piece of ham or something or tqlknto them like good boy etc?
     
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  16. Blake.H

    Blake.H B/1-7 Section Leader Corporal Active Member

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    Literally play with them and their toys and give them plenty of positive and happy encouragement. Tell them how good their being and get them excited for their toys so that they know they are theirs to play with.
     
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  17. Black.A

    Black.A C/1-7 Trooper Specialist Active Member

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    They just looking for something to do. Playing with a toy and you is way more fun that chewing a book.

    This is why negative reaction is bad. Because a dog would rather be in trouble than be bored or ignored.

    If the dog is not super toy motivated get a chew (I recommend a bully stick as they are one of the few puppy safe chews) and have it at the ready if you see them looking for trouble or available to them when you're not paying attention.¹

    ¹ Do not leave your dog unattended with a chew unless you know for a fact they are responsible chewers. (my dog tries to choke herself to death every time, she can not be left with a chew unsupervised)
     
    Last edited: Nov 21, 2019
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  18. Black.A

    Black.A C/1-7 Trooper Specialist Active Member

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    Also. depending on the dog. This is kinda generalising. But, You usualy can leave a dog in a crate for 1 hour for every month old they are:
    1 month old = 1 hour unattended with out bathroom
    4 month old = 4 hours unattended with out bathroom

    This works until about 6 months and 6 hours. If you work 8 hours, or more, it's really asking a lot for your dog to wait all that time. Adult dog will go 6-8 hours sleeping at night already, then to have a quick pee and poop only to go back to sleep for 8-9 hours. It's torture, they are smart and need more; Even the most mind-numbing job is better than sitting in a 2x5 box looking at the wall (cubical jokes aside).

    Your dog will be 6+ months old in no time. But don't neglect their needs or bad behavior will increase.
    I recommend that if you are working 8 or more hours a day to either get a neighborhood kid, or pay a dog walker, to give your dog a break at around the 4-5 hour mark.

    Different Dogs need different levels of physical and mental exercise.
    -I have a lazy Pitbull that needs about a 30 min walk 2 times a day and we do a 20 min "good manners exercise" were I take her to a store and work with her to be calm and attentive with lots of distractions. "Good manners exercise" is her job and he has a special harness so she knows its good manners time. Then she needs 10 hours of snuggles with human.
    -Something like a Australian Cattle Dog aka "Blue/Red Heeler" need about 2-6 hours a day of exercise and 2-6 hours of mental activity, that's almost the whole day!

    Work with a trainer or local humane scociety. Working with your dog and understanding the way it sees the world and helping it understand your needs is the best feeling!!!





    dogs rule cats drool. get over it.
     
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  19. Morrow.J

    Morrow.J C/1-7 Trooper Corporal Active Member

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    The worst part is that they are technically my mom and step dad's dogs. They love me the most and mind me the most. But every time I try to explain this stuff and doggy psychology and negative versus positive reinforcement etc they don't listen. They think that the dogs are doing it because they are mad at them or something. It is very frustrating. They are older and they will not listen to my advice even though I have clearly much better effect at training the dogs than they have. Like they come to me when I call them, they sit etc with me. I try to explain to them that the dogs don't understand after the fact that they have done something wrong etc. I offered to buy toys and my mom is like "I don't care about toys I want them to not chew" I am like MOM! That is what the toys are for but you gotta train them!